Where we stand

Towards a National Education Service

When we invest in people to develop their skills and capabilities, we all benefit from a stronger economy and society.

Local Policy

Schools in North Yorkshire could face losses of up to £27 million by 2019 due to the Tories’ proposed ‘fairer funding formula’. Nationally, this will account for an 8% cut in spending per pupil – the first drop since the mid-1990s, prompting even the Conservative’s own back-bench MPs to voice their disapproval.

The measures being put in place supposedly to address unfair funding allocation across the country will result in 98% of schools facing cuts according to teaching unions. With North Yorkshire already being one of the lowest funded areas in the country, these cuts could be particularly damaging.

Tory claims that funding will increase are inaccurate in real terms as they do not account for the huge increase in student numbers across the country. The majority of schools already have a spending deficit because of rising student numbers and high running costs, and this has become increasingly common in recent years. The percentage of maintained secondary schools with a spending deficit has increased from 33% in 2012-13 to 59% in 2015-16, even including Conservative-preferred academies which have seen an increase from 38% to 60%.

The 2015 Tory manifesto promised that ‘the amount of money following your child into school will be protected’. However, head teachers and governors are now faced with the possibility of

  • Increased class sizes
  • Loss of school staff
  • Cuts to resources forextra-curricular activities
  • Shortened school days or afour-day week

Morale is already low amongst teachers, with struggles to keep qualified staff in the profession for more than 3-5 years. The additional pressure and threat of staff cuts posed by the changes to funding could be the final straw for the education system as we know it.

Parents are increasingly asked to cover the funding shortfall through voluntary contributions towards books and other basic resources, and if this became more widespread, it would disproportionately affect schools in disadvantaged areas which already face so many challenges.

Education is a top priority for Labour, with plans for a National Education Service which would ensure adequate investment is made across the full spectrum of education, from early years toadult provision.

National Policy

Towards a National Education Service

When it fails, it isn’t just the individual that is held back, but all of us. When we invest in people to develop their skills and capabilities, we all benefit from a stronger economy and society.

At a time when working lives and the skills our economy needs are changing rapidly, governments have the responsibility to make lifelong learning a reality by giving everyone the opportunity to access education throughout their lives.

To meet this responsibility, Labour will create a unified National Education Service (NES) for England to move towards cradle-to-grave learning that is free at the point of use. The NES will be built on the principle that ‘Every Child – and Adult Matters’ and will incorporate all forms of education, from early years through to adult education.

Labour would:

  1. Overhaul the existing childcare system in which subsidies are given directly to parents who often struggle to use them, and transition to a system of high-quality childcare places in mixed environments with direct government subsidy
  2. Maintain current commitments on free hours and make significant capital investment during our first two years of government, to ensure that the places exist to meet demand
  3. Phase in subsidised provision on top of free-hour entitlements, to ensure that everyone has access to affordable childcare, no matter their working pattern.
  4. Transition to a qualified, graduate-led workforce, by increasing staff wages and enhancing training opportunities. This will benefit staff, who are among our worst-paid workers and improve child development
  5. Extend the 30 free hours to all two-year-olds, and move towards making some childcare available for one-year-olds and extending maternity pay to 12 months

Tory cuts to education

North Yorkshire

0 M
Lost out on between
2015 & 2019
0
Per-pupil loss
in funding

Harrogate Grammar

0 M
Lost out on between
2015 & 2019
0
Per-pupil loss
in funding

Rossett School

0 M
Lost out on between
2015 & 2019
0
Per-pupil loss
in funding

St Aidan's

0 M
Lost out on between
2015 & 2019
0
Per-pupil loss
in funding

Sourced from www.schoolcuts.org.uk.
Data updated 25 March 2019.

Our Latest News

News & Events


Catch the latest news, views and debate from your Harrogate & Knaresborough Labour Party